Good luck to everyone still plugging away at NaNoWriMo!

Separate... but never alone

Separate… but never alone

“Alone. Yes, that’s the key word, the most awful word in the English tongue. Murder doesn’t hold a candle to it and hell is only a poor synonym.”
– Stephen King

Writing, at its core, is a solitary endeavor. On top of all the challenges threatening to crush the success out of creative works, it almost seems unfair that we have to bear those burdens alone.

But such is the lot of writers. Our productive output isn’t about inspiration or muse-motivated moments of eureka. It’s about sitting your butt down and teasing out one unwilling word after the next. It’s about wrestling each scene from the white-knuckled grip of your inner editor and body slamming it onto the page.

Books, articles and blog posts about writing process are legion, and writers would do well to study what individual routines work for successful, prolific authors. But the introverted writer is a habitual creature, so draped in routine and ritual that one’s process is very unlikely to work for another.

And so we invent tricks and rewards to keep us moving forward.

Remember, however, that November is different. Certainly, NaNoWriMo is a chance to write. But it’s also a chance to be part of a community, a movement of united makers intent on creating art and crossing a 50,000-word finish line at the end of the month.

Although the actual act of writing is a singularly reclusive pursuit, support structures like NaNoWriMo are a comforting confirmation that we’re not tilting at fictional windmills alone. Remember that there is an army of wordsmiths out there banging away at keyboards and purposefully gripped pens scratching away in every corner of the world.

We're more than half way through the month. If you need a push, now might be a good time to check out the NaNoWriMo forums.

We’re more than half way through the month. If you need a push, now might be a good time to check out the NaNoWriMo forums.

Write how you need to write, but if you’re struggling – if you’ve fallen behind your daily word count or your story feels like it’s starting to come off the rails – it’s okay to find yourself a broad and welcoming shoulder. And when you do, feel free to lean on that sucker for support.

But no one can write your book for you. You were always destined to do that part on your own.

So close your door. Or put on your headphones. Maybe get up early while everyone you know is still asleep.

Then write. And know that others will be doing the same. Separate… but never alone.

Can the right app make you read 400+ words per minute?


Before reading any further, take a look at the clock. Jot down the time. I know, it’s a weird way to start a blog post, but it will make sense in a bit, I promise.

How much time do you spend reading news articles or blog posts? If you’re like most people, you spend at least a few minutes per day catching up on current events or what your favorite blogs are writing about. One way to check is to look at your RescueTime report for News and Opinion – last month I spent over thirteen hours on it. It may or may not take up huge amounts of time for you, but wouldn’t it be nice to get some of that time back for other things? What if you could read twice as fast and still retain the same amount of information? Seems great, but I’m not sure I want it quite enough to invest the effort in learning to speed read.

That’s why I was really intrigued to see a presentation at last month’s Quantified Self 2015 European Conference. Kyrill Potapov gave a fascinating talk about his experience with Spritz, a new technology that promises to make it easy to dramatically increase your normal reading speed. That’s normally a marketing claim I’d be skeptical of, but one of the great things about Quantified Self talks is that they generally come packed with data.

Kyrill Potapov sharing how he increased his reading speed to 400 words per minute using Spritz, a speed reading app. #qseu15 #productivity #speedreading

A photo posted by RescueTime (@rescuetime) on

Kyrill doesn’t work for Spritz – he’s a secondary school teacher in London – but he was interested enough in increasing his reading efficiency that he sought out the tool and tracked his progress as he used it. And the results were dramatic. He was able to increase his average reading speed by nearly 100%, up to over 400 words per minute. The best part was, it didn’t seem like it took all that much effort on his part. No special training, no exercises, just start reading using the app.

The method Spritz uses is called Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP)  and it works by reducing the amount of distance your eye has to travel while reading. Instead of scanning back and forth across lines of text, the words are presented in a rapid continuous stream one at a time. There is technically more to it than that, but that’s the main thing you will notice when you try it. As far as I can tell, this makes reading faster in two ways. First, you shave off the fractions of a second your eye usually spends moving from word to word – or line to line. Second, as words are only displayed once, you are forced to pay attention or you will miss out. It’s a different experience than reading normal text, but not an unpleasant one. In fact, the need to pay attention was so apparent that I found it easier to tune out outside distractions.

There are several apps that use the Spritz technology, so in theory it should be easy to start using it. In practice it was a little harder than I wanted it to be. Many apps involved copying and pasting large blocks of text into a text field, which is more cumbersome than I will probably use and felt like little more than a fun demonstration. That said, there is a Chrome extension called Readline that seems to work really well. When I’m on a page I want to read quickly, I just highlight the text, right click and select “start Readline”.

I’m currently reading at about 400 words per minute, and I feel like I retain most of what I read. There are a few places it completely falls apart – like reading a long news article that has ads mingling with the content. But so long as I’m careful about which text I select, it seems like it really helps. There is some debate about whether or not Spritz enables anything more than skimming, but when I’m reading news or blog posts I’m usually not extraordinarily invested in the content in the first place. In fact, in a context like that where I’m likely skimming anyway, Spritz actually makes me absorb more by forcing me through the whole post linearly.

So if you are looking for an easy hack that can save a few minutes each day, give Spritz a try, and let us know in the comments what you think of it.

Oh, one more thing. Remember when I asked you to look at the clock at the start of the post? Check the time now. How many minutes did it take you to get here? This post is about 800 words, so if you were reading with Spritz set at 400 wpm, this post would take you 2 minutes. :)

Are you ready for National Novel Writing Month?

National Novel Writing Month is just days away, and RescueTime is proud to sponsor this amazing event. For the uninitiated, NaNoWriMo is a worldwide program supporting aspiring writers on their quests to become novelists.

How? By equipping them to write a 50,000-word novel in 30 days.

Whether you’re a first-timer or a grizzled, word-slinging veteran, NaNoWriMo is a marathon test of a writer’s dedication and endurance. And just like you wouldn’t run a marathon without a personal strategy for success, NaNoWriMo participants that show up on November 1st with a plan will have the best shot at crossing the finish line with a 50,000-word rough draft.

In this post, we’re going to focus on the math behind clobbering your 50k goal. It’s worth noting, however, that outlining your novel, character essays and world building can all factor in to your plan of attack. Regardless of your upfront effort, come November 1, the only thing that matters is hitting the 50k mark before the clock ticks down to midnight on the 30th.

Every damn day

Professional authors are notorious for offering one recurring piece of advice to young writers, “Write every day.”

In practice, writing every day may not be an option for many people. Yet at its core this common counsel is an admonishment for new writers to make a habit of committing words to the page on some sort of regular, scheduled basis.

Maybe you believe that new habits can be formed in 21 days, a figure commonly – and perhaps mistakenly – attributed to 1960s surgeon Maxwell Maltz. Or perhaps you buy into more recent research from the University College London that claims 66 days are required to form a habit. Either way, writing every day can make the unfamiliar and daunting prospect of weaving fiction from the aether become common and comfortable.

Many writers approach NaNoWriMo with a write-every-day strategy. This means 1,670 words from brain to fingers and out onto the page every day for 30 days. This method grants the lowest possible daily word count, and also helps jumpstart your habit-forming countdown to becoming a habitual writer.

Note that if you can only write on weekdays, the daily word requirement jumps to 2,380 words per day. And if you can only write on weekend days, well… good luck and make sure you have ice for your wrists!

Getting ridiculous

One way to stack the odds (or words?) in your favor is to capitalize on early enthusiasm and any advanced groundwork you’ve prepared in anticipation of NaNoWriMo. Many WriMos use the surge of November 1st excitement to fuel an ambitious DORG – that is, a Day One Ridiculous Goal.

I’ve been writing professionally for most of my adult life. I’ve been seriously pursuing my fiction work for over half a decade. I’ve written multiple novels, sell thousands of non-fiction words every month and have published both novellas and short stories. Even still, my greatest ever single-day word count is 10,112 words and it damn near killed me.

It was a ridiculous goal. In fact, it was a challenge made to all attendees at a writing retreat and each one of us that broke the 10k mark received a homemade pie of our choosing. Mine was a peanut butter chocolate silk, and the pie damn near killed me, too!

Ermahgerd it was good, but I wouldn’t have earned it without setting the goal and making a personal commitment to achieve it. Even though 10,000 words a day is not a pace that I can or care to sustain, I know that, for me, it’s doable. And it’s a legitimate way to kick start a new project.

One good thing about NaNoWriMo this year is that November 1st is on a Sunday and not a regular work or school day. If you can arrange to have the day all to yourself, or with a writing partner or group, maybe a setting a DORG will work for you.

Consider for a moment the impact that a 10,000-word day one will have on your daily word requirement for the rest of the month. It drops that daily obligation to 1,380.

Don’t think you have a 10k day in you? You can still drop that daily word requirement by nearly 120 words with a 5k DORG.

Slow and steady can certainly win the race. Still, if you feel like challenging yourself and capitalizing on early enthusiasm, set a day one goal and make it ridiculous.

What happens when things get hard?

Life happens. Experienced WriMos will tell you that statistically, “life” will probably happen to you somewhere near the start of Week 3.

It could be work that threatens your NaNoWriMo performance. Maybe it’s a sick kid. Hell, it could be family drama at Thanksgiving dinner. Whatever the cause might be, there may come a time when your NaNo-plan starts to unravel.

What can you do to keep a setback from derailing the entire month?

For starters, you can write ahead of schedule if you suspect you might get derailed. In the vein of “the best defense is a good offense,” consider banking some heavy writing days early in the month. This can give you a cushion should the wheels come off the tracks mid-month.

If building an early cushion is not an option and you find yourself behind, take heart. You still have options. They may be the nail-biting, breathless kind of options, but options nonetheless.

Your first is to simply up your daily word count. Your NaNoWriMo profile will help you track your progress and update your daily requirements to finish on time. Alternatively, you can chip away at the word deficit with some early morning or weekend sprint sessions.

Either way, playing catch-up is probably going to be more difficult than sticking to a plan. Think ahead and plan out the month now. If you have a plan that’s worked well in the past, please share it in the comments. Also, if you think you’re onto a killer strategy and want some feedback, clue us in now and let us know how it’s going as the month progresses.

Good luck, WriMos! And if you haven’t yet, take advantage of our NaNoWriMo promo and get RescueTime premium free for the entire month of Nomember.

NaNoWriMo sponsor badges final-04

Systematically Turning Time and Effort Into Results


If you’ve found this column, we probably share a few things in common. Like me, you may be at your best with a great many irons in the proverbial fire. I bet you keep yourself busy and nurse a hunger for getting things done.

The past few months, my drive to tackle new projects has generated a daunting slate of work. I’ve been blessed with an attractive array of interesting projects, and that’s when I really need to ensure that my keyboard time is converted into an actual work product.

And that’s a good thing. Like I said, I’m at my best when busy.

But committing to aggressive schedules does create a challenge. I need to ensure that the minutes and hours I spend are productive. I need to ask myself two questions:

How do I know if I’m succeeding? And what can I do to set myself up for success?

Counting words and getting sh** done


Most activities lend themselves to some sort of quantifiable performance measurement. For writers, that metric is word count.

“I tend, by now, to think in terms of word counts not hours.” – Guy Gavriel Kay

“I’m writing a novel,” is a commendable, yet unimpressive statement if you’re only grinding out 150 words a day. Gee, that’s super swell. I’m really looking forward to reading the rough draft… in like, 3 years.

On the other hand, if you’re churning through 500 words an hour? Well now we’re talking!

Word count is a meaningful measuring stick for writers because it reflects results achieved rather than merely cataloguing effort expended.

Taking the pulse

RescueTime_-_Your_Monthly_dashboardRescueTime’s Productivity Pulse is similar in this regard. It is an accurate look back at how we’ve made use of our time at the keyboard. Just like tracking my word count, monitoring my Productivity Pulse is a useful and highly visual way to hold myself personally accountable for working efficiently. But we need a goal to work toward if we want to see our productivity increase over time, a goal and the tools necessary to achieve it.

“When asked, ‘How do you write?’ I invariably answer, ‘One word at a time,’” – Stephen King

A few weeks ago, I posted about using the Pomodoro technique to increase productivity by dedicating short sprints of time to specific tasks or distraction-free work. If words-per-hour is my measure of productivity, a series of sprints toward my daily word goal seems like a reasonable and efficient strategy for success.

But it’s SO easy to become derailed by “important” distractions like research and email, or social media indulgences that I know I’ll regret later.

That’s where Focus Time comes in.

I actually use the Pomodoro technique quite a bit, although I don’t use a physical timer or one of the many smartphone Pomodoro apps. Instead, I use the “Get Focused…” option that RescueTime put on my computers toolbar.

Not only does it time my work sprints, FocusTime blocks online distractions that might otherwise devalue my efforts.

For me, FocusTime is a strict upgrade to my old Pomodoro timer.

Reflect on the past, Focus on results

Tracking word count is by its very nature a look back in time. It is a reflective process and one that is beneficial only in that it illustrates past performance. It is not inherently useful in assuring current performance. And tracking it certainly won’t guarantee productivity in the future.

Like financial accounting, word count reports what has been accomplished in the past.

“Word count has value in that it measures actual effort.” – Chuck Wendig

It is valuable to know where we’ve come from, to have a baseline and to understand what we’ve been able to accomplish in the past. But what if we need to ensure a certain level of current performance? And what if we want to improve performance over time?

To continue the accounting metaphor, we need a budget. Some goals to aim for.

Whether it’s words per hour, lines of code or bullet points ruthlessly purged from a to-do list, we can set meaningful and manageable short-term goals, then continuously work towards improving them. Having a measurable task at hand (e.g. “Write 200 words in the next half hour”) can give us a new lens to look back on past performance, and help us find new ways to eliminate distractions.

“Just write. Many writers have a vague hope that elves will come in the night and finish any stories for you. They won’t.” – Neil Gaiman

When you decide to work, commit. Eliminate distractions and focus on the job. It won’t finish for you, so find the tools and tricks you need to be productive.

Sweep distractions free from your path, if even only for a time. And then focus on the next word, the next task, or the next bit of logic. When you truly need to produce measurable results, be single-minded and ruthlessly efficient with your time.

How to use the new RescueTime IFTTT channel to stay focused and productive

IFTTT (If This Then That)

Big news! We launched a channel on IFTTT this week, and it opens up a bunch of different possibilities for using your RescueTime data with your favorite apps and devices.

If you’re unfamiliar, IFTTT stands for: “If This Then That”, is pronounced like: “GIFT”, and is a service that lets you take actions in one app in response to actions in another. Since you spend so much of your time plugged into your digital devices, there are a LOT of actions you can take.

IFTTT channels have two parts.  The first are Triggers – things that happen in your app than can cause things to happen in others. Second are Actions – things that can respond to a Trigger in another app. The combination of a Trigger and an Action is called a Recipe.

The RescueTime IFTTT channel has four triggers…

…and two Actions.
... and two Actions.

You can connect our channel to any of the hundreds of other channels on IFTTT (although some of them make a lot more sense then others). IFTTT has channels for business apps, smartphones, social networks, even home automation devices.

The possibilities are nearly endless, but here are a few of the Recipes we really like:

Silence your phone while in a FocusTime session

IFTTT Recipe: Mute phone when a FocusTime session is started connects rescuetime to android-device

IFTTT Recipe: Unmute your phone when a FocusTime session finishes connects rescuetime to android-device

Use Google Calendar to start a FocusTime session…

IFTTT Recipe: Schedule FocusTime sessions in advance by marking off time on your calendar connects google-calendar to rescuetime

…or add a do-not-disturb note when FocusTime starts

IFTTT Recipe: Add a 'do-not-disturb' event to your calendar when a FocusTime session starts connects rescuetime to google-calendar

Set up a productivity light

IFTTT has several channels that will let you control a light (or a set of lights). You can use the Recipes below with the Phillips Hue, ORBneXt, and Blink(1) channels.

IFTTT Recipe: Turn on a 'do-not-disturb' light while in a FocusTime Session connects rescuetime to orbnext

IFTTT Recipe: Turn off your do-not-disturb light when a FocusTime session ends connects rescuetime to orbnext

IFTTT Recipe: Flash Blink(1) when a RescueTime alert is triggered connects rescuetime to blink-1

Adjust your thermostat while in a FocusTime session

If you want to give yourself some extra motivation, set your Nest thermostat to something really comfortable either while you are in a FocusTime session, or after you’ve completed a few hours of productive work.

IFTTT Recipe: Set the temperature to something really comfy when you are in a FocusTime session connects rescuetime to nest-thermostat

IFTTT Recipe: Reward yourself by turning the thermostat to something more comfortable after working for a while. connects rescuetime to nest-thermostat

Use alerts to post messages to Slack

You can use RescueTime alerts as an automated way to humblebrag (or publicly shame yourself) to your coworkers.

IFTTT Recipe: If a RescueTime alert is triggered, post a note about it in Slack connects rescuetime to slack

Get a phone call whenever an alert is triggered

This one is super effective for getting me to stop working when it’s late at night. I have an alert set up for “more than 30 minutes of productive time between midnight and 4am”. When my phone rings in the middle of the night, that momentary “who the hell is calling me at 1am?!?!” feeling is the BEST way to knock me out of the workaholic hole I’ve fallen into.
IFTTT Recipe: Call my phone when a RescueTime alert triggers. connects rescuetime to phone-call

Save daily summaries in a Google Sheet

This one is great if you just want to pull some specific data over time into a spreadsheet. It’s perfect for Quantified Self projects where you’re tracking one metric (say, hours of productive time) against another data source (like your daily exercise or sleep).
IFTTT Recipe: If new daily summary is available, log a row in a Google Sheets spreadsheet connects rescuetime to google-drive

We’re particularly excited about the FocusTime Triggers and Actions, which let you tailor your FocusTime experience in some really powerful ways. You can read more on that over here.

What recipes have you come up with? Share your favorites in the comments!

Introducing the new FocusTime


Today we’re launching an exciting new version of FocusTime to help people be less distracted at work.

We’ve added integrations that let your apps and devices take actions that support a positive work environment. This makes it easy to create the best conditions for focus, on demand and at the right times.

For example, when you are in a FocusTime session, you can:

  • Silence your phone, including notifications
  • Set your Slack presence to ‘away’
  • Post a do-not-disturb note to your calendar, group chat, or company social network
  • Block access to distracting websites

Everyone’s work situation is different so we’ve added integrations that connect to a lot of different services so you can find the right combination of actions that works for you.

New integrations that support your productivity

FocusTime is now connected to IFTTT (If This Then That), Zapier, and Slack. We expect to add more integrations in the future, but here’s an overview of where we are right now.

IFTTT (If This Then That)

IFTTT connects hundreds of apps and devices together. Combined with FocusTime, it can do some REALLY interesting things to set up a good environment for sustained focus. Their support for devices and home automation is particularly interesting, enabling things like silencing your Android phone, dimming your Philips Hue lights, even adjusting your Nest thermostat so you’re more comfortable while you’re focusing (which can be a nice bit of motivation on it’s own!)

I have an ORBneXt light sitting on my desk that glows blue when I’m in a FocusTime session. It’s a nice way to let other people know I’m in the zone, and it’s also a subtle reminder to me to stay on track.


Zapier is similar to IFTTT in that they both connect multiple services together, but Zapier has more of a focus on business applications. If you want to post a do-not-disturb note to your coworkers, Zapier has support for Slack, HipChat, Flowdock, Basecamp, Yammer, and many more.

I have a Zap set up connecting Trello and FocusTime that’s proven to be really useful for me. I manage the things I’m working on in Trello, but I have a special list for really high-priority tasks that are “On Fire!”, like critical bugs. Whenever a new card gets added to that list, a FocusTime session automatically kicks in so I can devote my full attention to the problem.


Seems like Slack is a common fixture in most offices these days. It’s really great at keeping people connected, but it can be a bit of a monster when you’re trying to focus. We added a Slack integration that will automatically set your presence to ‘away’ and optionally post a note in the channel of your choice letting people know you’re stepping away for some concentration, and when to expect you back.


Are work distractions really that big of a problem?


Multiple studies have shown that it can take between 15-30 minutes to fully return to a task after an interruption (that’s not counting tasks that are completely abandoned). The problem with even the most optimistic of those numbers is, most people get some kind of interruption roughly every 5 minutes This is a huge deal, because it basically means no one can get into a solid state of flow.

So essentially no one is working at their peak potential. Why aren’t more people up in arms about this? I’m not  sure, but I think it’s because after a while, that level of distraction starts to feel normal. And the alternative – simply unplugging – doesn’t feel very good. We’re conditioned to be ultra-responsive, and that’s become a general expectation in many offices. But the levels of interruption are clearly reaching unsustainable levels.

We’re connected to all these apps and devices that constantly spew information at us, but they have no awareness of whether or not we actually WANT that information at a given time. That seems like something that should be fixable, so that’s what we set out to do. My hope with FocusTime is that we give people a way to disconnect “just enough” so they can get back to more solid levels of focus.

What we’re launching today is a really good start, but there’s a lot to explore in the future, and I’m really excited to see what other ways we can find to turn down the noise, and get people prepped for focus.

I’d love it if you’d give the new integrations a try and let us know what works well for you, and what you find missing that you wished was included.

The little tomato that could – using Pomodoro Technique

Tomatoes Rule - source: Art & Invention Gallery

Tomatoes Rule – source: Art & Invention Gallery

Nobody loves a blank page. I think I’m probably better than the average bear about starting new things, but it’s tough to get rolling on a new project. Especially when the task is enormous and you know it’s going to take a long time.

And like a lot of creative-types, it’s easy for me to get down on myself. My productivity usually sucks when my confidence and self-esteem are low.

Sometimes I just need a little external pressure – some sort of structure – to get me moving. If I can get a small portion of my time encapsulated and dedicated to getting things accomplished, that usually gets me over the hump.

That’s when I want something like the Pomodoro Technique, a workflow that structures your time in 25 minute sprints on a dedicated task, followed by a 5 minute break, then starting the cycle over again with a new task.

Pomodoro isn’t something I use all the time. However, when my confidence is low or I’m feeling overwhelmed, I need the implied structure to get me moving.

What’s a tomato got to do with it?

The Pomodoro Technique is a productivity system created by developer and author Francesco Cirillo. He named the system after a tomato shaped kitchen timer that he used to keep himself focused and productive at college.

Lifehacker has a good primer on the system with links to a handful of Pomodoro mobile apps. Most of the apps have a variety of competing bells and whistles; so check those out to see what excites you. However, all you really need is the timer.

The timer is a simple tool used to carve out an interval of dedicated work time. A short 25-minute sprint of work that Cirillo called his “Pomodoros.” Following each sprint is a 5-minute break and then… back to the salt mines!

You can do anything for 25 minutes

As I said, I don’t use my Pomodoro timer all the time. Actually, I probably don’t use it as much as I should. Still, when I’m down on myself, it can be the kick-in-the-pants that I need to get moving.

When I’m facing a seemingly endless or insurmountable obstacle – say… the first draft of a new novel, perhaps? – my Pomodoro timer carves me off a consumable first-bite. Something manageable enough to get things rolling, but big enough to show some progress and boost my confidence.

If you happen to find it difficult to stay on task during the 25 minute sessions, FocusTime is a great compliment to the Pomodoro technique. You can block distracting websites for the exact time of your session, giving you extra insurance that you’ll stay focused.

Site blocking for a Pomodoro session using FocusTime

Putting it to work

A big part of staying productive is changing things up. There’s real value in moving between standing to sitting or leaving the office to work at a coffee shop for a couple hours.

“To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often.” – Winston Churchill

Pomodoro is like that for me. It’s not something that I use or want all the time. However, if I’m struggling, that 25-minute timer on my phone can help me get the ball (tomato?) rolling.

Let us know in the comments if you use the Pomodoro Technique. Did it work for you? What else do you use to overcome the idle hands of low confidence? Or to take the that first intimidating leap into a daunting new challenge?