Good luck to everyone still plugging away at NaNoWriMo!

Separate... but never alone

Separate… but never alone

“Alone. Yes, that’s the key word, the most awful word in the English tongue. Murder doesn’t hold a candle to it and hell is only a poor synonym.”
– Stephen King

Writing, at its core, is a solitary endeavor. On top of all the challenges threatening to crush the success out of creative works, it almost seems unfair that we have to bear those burdens alone.

But such is the lot of writers. Our productive output isn’t about inspiration or muse-motivated moments of eureka. It’s about sitting your butt down and teasing out one unwilling word after the next. It’s about wrestling each scene from the white-knuckled grip of your inner editor and body slamming it onto the page.

Books, articles and blog posts about writing process are legion, and writers would do well to study what individual routines work for successful, prolific authors. But the introverted writer is a habitual creature, so draped in routine and ritual that one’s process is very unlikely to work for another.

And so we invent tricks and rewards to keep us moving forward.

Remember, however, that November is different. Certainly, NaNoWriMo is a chance to write. But it’s also a chance to be part of a community, a movement of united makers intent on creating art and crossing a 50,000-word finish line at the end of the month.

Although the actual act of writing is a singularly reclusive pursuit, support structures like NaNoWriMo are a comforting confirmation that we’re not tilting at fictional windmills alone. Remember that there is an army of wordsmiths out there banging away at keyboards and purposefully gripped pens scratching away in every corner of the world.

We're more than half way through the month. If you need a push, now might be a good time to check out the NaNoWriMo forums.

We’re more than half way through the month. If you need a push, now might be a good time to check out the NaNoWriMo forums.

Write how you need to write, but if you’re struggling – if you’ve fallen behind your daily word count or your story feels like it’s starting to come off the rails – it’s okay to find yourself a broad and welcoming shoulder. And when you do, feel free to lean on that sucker for support.

But no one can write your book for you. You were always destined to do that part on your own.

So close your door. Or put on your headphones. Maybe get up early while everyone you know is still asleep.

Then write. And know that others will be doing the same. Separate… but never alone.