Are you ready for National Novel Writing Month?

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National Novel Writing Month is just days away, and RescueTime is proud to sponsor this amazing event. For the uninitiated, NaNoWriMo is a worldwide program supporting aspiring writers on their quests to become novelists.

How? By equipping them to write a 50,000-word novel in 30 days.

Whether you’re a first-timer or a grizzled, word-slinging veteran, NaNoWriMo is a marathon test of a writer’s dedication and endurance. And just like you wouldn’t run a marathon without a personal strategy for success, NaNoWriMo participants that show up on November 1st with a plan will have the best shot at crossing the finish line with a 50,000-word rough draft.

In this post, we’re going to focus on the math behind clobbering your 50k goal. It’s worth noting, however, that outlining your novel, character essays and world building can all factor in to your plan of attack. Regardless of your upfront effort, come November 1, the only thing that matters is hitting the 50k mark before the clock ticks down to midnight on the 30th.

Every damn day

Professional authors are notorious for offering one recurring piece of advice to young writers, “Write every day.”

In practice, writing every day may not be an option for many people. Yet at its core this common counsel is an admonishment for new writers to make a habit of committing words to the page on some sort of regular, scheduled basis.

Maybe you believe that new habits can be formed in 21 days, a figure commonly – and perhaps mistakenly – attributed to 1960s surgeon Maxwell Maltz. Or perhaps you buy into more recent research from the University College London that claims 66 days are required to form a habit. Either way, writing every day can make the unfamiliar and daunting prospect of weaving fiction from the aether become common and comfortable.

Many writers approach NaNoWriMo with a write-every-day strategy. This means 1,670 words from brain to fingers and out onto the page every day for 30 days. This method grants the lowest possible daily word count, and also helps jumpstart your habit-forming countdown to becoming a habitual writer.

Note that if you can only write on weekdays, the daily word requirement jumps to 2,380 words per day. And if you can only write on weekend days, well… good luck and make sure you have ice for your wrists!

Getting ridiculous

One way to stack the odds (or words?) in your favor is to capitalize on early enthusiasm and any advanced groundwork you’ve prepared in anticipation of NaNoWriMo. Many WriMos use the surge of November 1st excitement to fuel an ambitious DORG – that is, a Day One Ridiculous Goal.

I’ve been writing professionally for most of my adult life. I’ve been seriously pursuing my fiction work for over half a decade. I’ve written multiple novels, sell thousands of non-fiction words every month and have published both novellas and short stories. Even still, my greatest ever single-day word count is 10,112 words and it damn near killed me.

It was a ridiculous goal. In fact, it was a challenge made to all attendees at a writing retreat and each one of us that broke the 10k mark received a homemade pie of our choosing. Mine was a peanut butter chocolate silk, and the pie damn near killed me, too!

Ermahgerd it was good, but I wouldn’t have earned it without setting the goal and making a personal commitment to achieve it. Even though 10,000 words a day is not a pace that I can or care to sustain, I know that, for me, it’s doable. And it’s a legitimate way to kick start a new project.

One good thing about NaNoWriMo this year is that November 1st is on a Sunday and not a regular work or school day. If you can arrange to have the day all to yourself, or with a writing partner or group, maybe a setting a DORG will work for you.

Consider for a moment the impact that a 10,000-word day one will have on your daily word requirement for the rest of the month. It drops that daily obligation to 1,380.

Don’t think you have a 10k day in you? You can still drop that daily word requirement by nearly 120 words with a 5k DORG.

Slow and steady can certainly win the race. Still, if you feel like challenging yourself and capitalizing on early enthusiasm, set a day one goal and make it ridiculous.

What happens when things get hard?

Life happens. Experienced WriMos will tell you that statistically, “life” will probably happen to you somewhere near the start of Week 3.

It could be work that threatens your NaNoWriMo performance. Maybe it’s a sick kid. Hell, it could be family drama at Thanksgiving dinner. Whatever the cause might be, there may come a time when your NaNo-plan starts to unravel.

What can you do to keep a setback from derailing the entire month?

For starters, you can write ahead of schedule if you suspect you might get derailed. In the vein of “the best defense is a good offense,” consider banking some heavy writing days early in the month. This can give you a cushion should the wheels come off the tracks mid-month.

If building an early cushion is not an option and you find yourself behind, take heart. You still have options. They may be the nail-biting, breathless kind of options, but options nonetheless.

Your first is to simply up your daily word count. Your NaNoWriMo profile will help you track your progress and update your daily requirements to finish on time. Alternatively, you can chip away at the word deficit with some early morning or weekend sprint sessions.

Either way, playing catch-up is probably going to be more difficult than sticking to a plan. Think ahead and plan out the month now. If you have a plan that’s worked well in the past, please share it in the comments. Also, if you think you’re onto a killer strategy and want some feedback, clue us in now and let us know how it’s going as the month progresses.

Good luck, WriMos! And if you haven’t yet, take advantage of our NaNoWriMo promo and get RescueTime premium free for the entire month of Nomember.

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